Chinese Netizen Fights Against Sexual Abuse of Boys

January 15, 2014
Editor: Nancy Sun
Chinese Netizen Fights Against Sexual Abuse of Boys
Under Chinese criminal law, the crime of rape applies to females only. Boys aged 14 and above have no laws that protect their rights against sex offenders. [nfdaily.cn]
"I will protect these children or my whole life will in vain. I will try the best I can. I hope you can understand me," posted Juan'er, a netizen who exposed a nine-member Weibo chat group of child molesters nearly two weeks ago, on her Weibo account on January 12.

Her strong sense of responsibility and firm attitude in protecting children has won her support and an active response from the public.

Two weeks ago, she accidentally came across an active Weibo chat group who were discussing their experiences in "seducing boys".

One of the members, a Hangzhou resident who went by the name of Shenbianboy, published sickening posts about 20 boys aged around 10 and matched them to sexually explicit terms such as "I want to eat you", according to the Weibo post forwarded by Juan'er.

In one picture, a boy with a pained expression lies in bed and the post says, "I cry though it's not so painful".

Shenbianboy claimed on his Weibo account that he is actually from Sichuan Province and works as a mobile phone salesman in Hangzhou. All of the posts have now been deleted.

"I felt so angry after seeing these pictures and words, we can't indulge these evil men in hurting boys and threatening their health," said Juan'er.

She reported the online posts and 103 screenshot pictures depicting the sexual abuse of the boys to the police on December 31 2013.

At least 20 boys were present in the pictures. Some of them also featured Shenbianboy himself, and others show boys present at his home.

The exposure has also provoked the anger of the public.

"These pictures and the relevant behavior are illegal," said Li Meijin, a criminal psychology professor at the People's Public Security University of China. "It allegedly involves the crime of acting indecently against a child."

It's not the first case of sexual abuse of young boys to be exposed by net users. In 2012, seven users published posts saying that their former high school teacher sexually assaulted them 10 years ago, with the victims only being 15-years-old when the abuse took place, China Central Television (CCTV) reported.

The exposure of this news caused Zhang Datong, vice principal of the No.2 High School of East China Normal University in Shanghai, to be removed from his post.

"Compared to girls, boys suffer fewer sexual assaults, but the psychological harm that the boys suffer is also very serious," said Beijing prosecutor Fu Xiaomei, "If no law protects them, their pain will become more serious."

In September of 2013, 27 NGOs jointly submitted a piece of advisory legislation to the Standing Committee of Guangzhou Municipal People's Congress, calling for the law to give equal protection to boys aged 18 and under in cases of sexual offenses.

In light of rampant sexual offences against underage boys, many people in China have realized such crimes are intolerable and must be punished severely by the law. Some criminal court judges have also expressed their concern at the low level of protection of underage boys.

Moreover, education on child molestation prevention in China is far from advanced when compared to that of Western countries. In the United States, children receive six stages of education on how to prevent molestation, starting early on in their education and continuing until they reach the graduate age of 18.

A well-known writer and child education expert suggested that primary schools in China start the school year with a lesson on how to prevent child molestation, after a string of molestation cases in schools were exposed across the country in 2013.

Zheng Yuanjie, a writer and child education expert dubbed the Chinese "King of Fairytales," recommended that the Ministry of Education and CCTV give students their "first lesson" on child sex abuse and initiated a survey on whether to conduct the lesson through his Sina Weibo account in August 2013.

Zheng's proposal was widely supported by Weibo users, as nearly 11,500 people, 96.8 percent of those who participated in the survey, agreed with his suggestion for the lesson.

(Source: china-woman.com/Translated and edited by womenofchina.cn)

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Background
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