Wang Huanrong

March 3, 2015
Editor: Kathy Cao
Wang Huanrong[Women of China]

Born in 1954, Wang Huanrong has worked as the CPC (the Communist Party of China) secretary and director of the local women's committee for Xigaozhuang, a village in north China's Hebei Province, since 1986. The 28 years of her career have borne witness to the great changes that she has helped the village undergo.

When Wang first arrived, Xigaozhuang was deeply impoverished. With little land and heavy debts, the village and its circumstances made it difficult for its residents to earn a respectable living just by farming. Wang realized that it was the villagers themselves who play the most vital role in turning around their fortunes, and so she then proposed her managing idea: Educate the mind, build up the village and serve the people.

Educating the Mind

To improve villagers' knowledge and skills, Wang established the first high school education center exclusively for farmers — an institution that provides English, accounting, management and other professional courses. Moreover, the village distributes free newspapers and magazines, encouraging further study of exemplary workers in village-owned enterprises and granting a variety of scholarships to students.

In 28 years, more than 6 million yuan (U.S. $1 million) has been invested in constructing comprehensive classrooms, libraries and activity centers as well as in inviting teachers to provide various training sessions. Now the villagers have not only better cultural knowledge and skills but also more well-rounded overall qualities.

Building up the Village

In the second year Wang came to Xigaozhuang, she opened the first factory in the village — a wire-producing factory that ended up earning 100,000 yuan (U.S. $15,990) in its first year. It wasn't long before other enterprises emerged, including chemical plant, steel mill and sports facility companies. In addition, Wang took advantage of the village's location — a rural–urban fringe area — turning manufacturing establishments into those of the service industry, with the likes of hotels, wholesale centers and homes for the elderly.

In 28 years, Wang has never slowed and is always in a hurry. She has 215 notebooks filled with her personal analysis in developing Xigaozhuang, even down to the possible measures for ensuring a healthy lifestyle for the village's elderly. "We are constantly putting the village through examinations," says Wang, "and villagers are the examiners who judge our results."

Serving the People

With the advancement of the village's development, Wang faces new difficulties and challenges all the time, but her dedication to helping build a better life for the people has never waned.

As part of one of the village's reconstruction projects, a number of enterprises were forced to be removed, resulting in more than 100 villagers' losing their jobs. Wang met with all the villagers and listened to their opinions. Through her tireless efforts, temporary commercial stores were set up to make up the economic loss, leaving all parties satisfied when all was said and done.

The year 2008 marked the completion of Xigaozhuang's village renovation. When choosing an apartment for herself within the new residential buildings, Wang trade rooms twice with other villagers in order to cater to their needs and finally ended up moving into the top floor, whose exposure to noise and less-than-ideal temperatures make it far from the most comfortable option. But Wang put her villagers' comfort and needs before her own.

She is also strict with herself. She has never purchased a car for her work and has forbidden any involvement of her friends or family members in village-owned enterprises. Under her guidance and leadership, the village saw no crime or appeal incidents over the past decade.

(Women of China)

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