Ban Zhao: A Female Confucian

  • May 13, 2013
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Among her many literary works, Ban Zhao composed a commentary on the popular Lives of Admirable Women by Liu Kiang (77- 6 BC) and later in life produced her most famous work, the Nv Jie, or Lessons for Women, which purports to be an instructional manual on feminine behavior and a ndvirtue for her daughters.

In fact, she intended it for a much wider audience. Realizing that Confucian texts contained little in the way of specific and practical guidlines for a woman's everyday hfe, Ban Zhao sought to fill that void with a coherent set of rules for women, especially young women.

More than forty years have passed since at the age of fourteen I took up the dustpan and the broom in the Cao family [the family into which she married].

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Ban Zhao: A Female Confucian

Among her many literary works, Ban Zhao composed a commentary on the popular Lives of Admirable Women by Liu Kiang (77- 6 BC) and later in life produced her most famous work, the Nv Jie, or Lessons for Women, which purports to be an instructional manual on feminine behavior and a ndvirtue for her daughters.

In fact, she intended it for a much wider audience. Realizing that Confucian texts contained little in the way of specific and practical guidlines for a woman's everyday hfe, Ban Zhao sought to fill that void with a coherent set of rules for women, especially young women.

More than forty years have passed since at the age of fourteen I took up the dustpan and the broom in the Cao family [the family into which she married].

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