China's Top Three Famous Women Diplomats

  • March 19, 2012
  • Editor: Yang Qian
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Fu Ying: The Powerful Persuader

Following in the footsteps of Wang Hairong, Fu Ying was the second female vice-foreign minister in the history of the People's Republic of China. [cpc.people.com.cn]

Following in the footsteps of Wang Hairong, Fu Ying was the second female vice-foreign minister in the history of the People's Republic of China. [cpc.people.com.cn]


Fu Ying, appointed as vice-foreign minister on January 4, 2009, became the second woman to hold the post and also the first ethnic minority female ambassador in the history of the People's Republic of China.

Fu belongs to the Mongolian ethnic minority and was born in Hohhot, capital of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, in January 1953. She graduated from the Beijing Foreign Studies University in 1977 and received her master's degree in International Relations in 1986 from the University of Kent, in the UK.

In 2003, Fu headed the Chinese delegation during diplomatic talks that led to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea agreeing to abandon its pursuit of nuclear weapons. She has worked in the Chinese embassies in Romania, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Australia. In 2007, she was appointed China's ambassador to the UK. She was appointed vice-foreign minister in 2009 and continues to hold the post until today.

As a statesperson, Fu has a very different people-management style from Wu Yi. "She always speaks gently, but with a clear and unwavering stance. Moreover, she is a true persuader," said Phoenix TV commentator Yang Jinlin.

Regarding the negative coverage on the protests against the torch relay of the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008, Fu said: "Many (Chinese born after the 1980s) who had previously held romantic views of the West are very disappointed at the media's attempt to demonize China. We all know that demonization feeds a counter-reaction. The world has waited for China to join it, now China has to have the patience to wait for the world to understand China."

In recent years, a series of events has led to great changes and development in Chinese diplomacy and foreign relations. This has manifested itself in a myriad of ways, but most importantly in the continued rise of female power in the country's diplomatic field.

(Source: cpc.people.com.cn / Translated and edited by womenofchina.cn)

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  • China's Top Three Famous Women Diplomats2012-03-19   Editor: Yang Qian

    Fu Ying: The Powerful Persuader

    Following in the footsteps of Wang Hairong, Fu Ying was the second female vice-foreign minister in the history of the People's Republic of China. [cpc.people.com.cn]

    Following in the footsteps of Wang Hairong, Fu Ying was the second female vice-foreign minister in the history of the People's Republic of China. [cpc.people.com.cn]


    Fu Ying, appointed as vice-foreign minister on January 4, 2009, became the second woman to hold the post and also the first ethnic minority female ambassador in the history of the People's Republic of China.

    Fu belongs to the Mongolian ethnic minority and was born in Hohhot, capital of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, in January 1953. She graduated from the Beijing Foreign Studies University in 1977 and received her master's degree in International Relations in 1986 from the University of Kent, in the UK.

    In 2003, Fu headed the Chinese delegation during diplomatic talks that led to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea agreeing to abandon its pursuit of nuclear weapons. She has worked in the Chinese embassies in Romania, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Australia. In 2007, she was appointed China's ambassador to the UK. She was appointed vice-foreign minister in 2009 and continues to hold the post until today.

    As a statesperson, Fu has a very different people-management style from Wu Yi. "She always speaks gently, but with a clear and unwavering stance. Moreover, she is a true persuader," said Phoenix TV commentator Yang Jinlin.

    Regarding the negative coverage on the protests against the torch relay of the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008, Fu said: "Many (Chinese born after the 1980s) who had previously held romantic views of the West are very disappointed at the media's attempt to demonize China. We all know that demonization feeds a counter-reaction. The world has waited for China to join it, now China has to have the patience to wait for the world to understand China."

    In recent years, a series of events has led to great changes and development in Chinese diplomacy and foreign relations. This has manifested itself in a myriad of ways, but most importantly in the continued rise of female power in the country's diplomatic field.

    (Source: cpc.people.com.cn / Translated and edited by womenofchina.cn)

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