China's Top Three Famous Women Diplomats

  • March 19, 2012
  • Editor: Yang Qian
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Wu Yi: China's Iron Lady

Wu Yi, vice premier of the State Council, was regarded as the Iron Lady of Chinese diplomacy. [cpc.people.com.cn]

Wu Yi, vice premier of the State Council, was regarded as the Iron Lady of Chinese diplomacy. [cpc.people.com.cn]

 
Wu Yi was born in Wuhan in central China's Hubei Province in the same year as Wang Hairong.

Although Wu never worked at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, she is regarded as the Iron Lady of Chinese diplomacy.

Wu became the vice minister of Foreign Economic Relations and Trade in April 1991. Four months later, she headed a Chinese delegation to the US to negotiate intellectual property rights.

Her efforts paid off when, in January 1992, China and the US signed a bilateral memorandum of understanding on Intellectual Property Rights (IPR). Since then, she has become a household name in China.

Wu earned her reputation for firmness when she used her negotiation skills to defend China's interests at international trade talks, while under pressure from foreign countries over the currency and trade surplus.

In March 2003, Wu was elected as vice premier of the State Council.

Wu is also admired for her tough stance on the Japanese issue that cropped up in May 2005. At the time, Sino-Japanese relations were shaky because Japanese Prime Minister Koizumi had visited the Yasukuni Shrine where some war criminals were honored. Anti-Japanese sentiment surged amongst the Chinese public.

In order to improve the situation, Wu began her visit to Japan on May 17, 2005 as vice premier of the State Council. However, when Prime Minister Koizumi excused his visit to the shrine as 'individual belief', Wu immediately canceled the meeting and flew back to China. Her swift decision and hard-line stance earned her a reputation for being a remarkable and unique diplomat in China's history.

With her impressive career, sharp personal style and nerves of steel, Wu has become well- known all over the world.

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  • China's Top Three Famous Women Diplomats2012-03-19   Editor: Yang Qian

    Wu Yi: China's Iron Lady

    Wu Yi, vice premier of the State Council, was regarded as the Iron Lady of Chinese diplomacy. [cpc.people.com.cn]

    Wu Yi, vice premier of the State Council, was regarded as the Iron Lady of Chinese diplomacy. [cpc.people.com.cn]

     
    Wu Yi was born in Wuhan in central China's Hubei Province in the same year as Wang Hairong.

    Although Wu never worked at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, she is regarded as the Iron Lady of Chinese diplomacy.

    Wu became the vice minister of Foreign Economic Relations and Trade in April 1991. Four months later, she headed a Chinese delegation to the US to negotiate intellectual property rights.

    Her efforts paid off when, in January 1992, China and the US signed a bilateral memorandum of understanding on Intellectual Property Rights (IPR). Since then, she has become a household name in China.

    Wu earned her reputation for firmness when she used her negotiation skills to defend China's interests at international trade talks, while under pressure from foreign countries over the currency and trade surplus.

    In March 2003, Wu was elected as vice premier of the State Council.

    Wu is also admired for her tough stance on the Japanese issue that cropped up in May 2005. At the time, Sino-Japanese relations were shaky because Japanese Prime Minister Koizumi had visited the Yasukuni Shrine where some war criminals were honored. Anti-Japanese sentiment surged amongst the Chinese public.

    In order to improve the situation, Wu began her visit to Japan on May 17, 2005 as vice premier of the State Council. However, when Prime Minister Koizumi excused his visit to the shrine as 'individual belief', Wu immediately canceled the meeting and flew back to China. Her swift decision and hard-line stance earned her a reputation for being a remarkable and unique diplomat in China's history.

    With her impressive career, sharp personal style and nerves of steel, Wu has become well- known all over the world.

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