Proposal on the Problem of Left-behind Children
2012-03-13By:Li WenjieEditor:Zhu Yanhong 
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Proposal on the Problem of Left-behind Children

[ibabyzone.cn] 

CPPCC member Li Yuling, who is vice-president of the Chinese Nation Unity and Progress Association and chairperson of the Board of Directors of Beijing New Century Success Group, has raised a proposal addressing the problem of left-behind children, suggesting innovations for the rural social management model and rural social development.

The term 'left-behind children' refers to children in rural areas whose parents have left to work in the bigger cities. The issue is currently one of the most serious social problems facing China's social development.

According to the statistics of related organizations, there are over 58 million left-behind children in rural areas of China. In provinces with the highest number of rural labor output, left-behind children account for almost 18% to 22% of the local children. As these children grow up without guardianship or parenting, most will face serious living and development problems, posing a severe challenge to the education of rural areas in China.

Taking all this into consideration, Li proposed to address the problem by carrying out a new social management pattern upheld by the following four pillars: governmental supervision and guidance, social work services, community self-help and societal support.

Firstly, the care of left-behind children should be regarded as an important evaluating factor in the performance of local governments in the development of 'New Countryside Construction' and 'Innovation in Social Management'. A special focus organization should be set up by the government to manage the well-being of local left-behind children. Specific teams should be assigned to keep in communication with the left-behind children project office. If possible, the service quality for left-behind children should be taken into consideration when evaluating cadres' work performance.

Secondly, a system of rural social workers should be established as quickly as possible. Working stations for social workers should be set up in rural areas to provide professional social services, in part as a functioning replacement of family. Funds should be raised by the state government for the training of rural social workers.

Thirdly, rural local communities should pitch in with their resources and communal strength to maintain a self-help system and continue educating and taking care of left-behind children with help from the government.

Fourthly, social organizations should be encouraged to get involved in the care and development of rural left-behind children. These organizations should also be allowed to come up with a variety of problem-solving models.

(Source: womenofchina.cn/ Translated and edited by womenofchina.cn)

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Proposal on the Problem of Left-behind Children

  • March 13, 2012
  • By Li Wenjie
  • Editor: Zhu Yanhong
  • Change Text Size: A  A  A

Proposal on the Problem of Left-behind Children

[ibabyzone.cn] 

CPPCC member Li Yuling, who is vice-president of the Chinese Nation Unity and Progress Association and chairperson of the Board of Directors of Beijing New Century Success Group, has raised a proposal addressing the problem of left-behind children, suggesting innovations for the rural social management model and rural social development.

The term 'left-behind children' refers to children in rural areas whose parents have left to work in the bigger cities. The issue is currently one of the most serious social problems facing China's social development.

According to the statistics of related organizations, there are over 58 million left-behind children in rural areas of China. In provinces with the highest number of rural labor output, left-behind children account for almost 18% to 22% of the local children. As these children grow up without guardianship or parenting, most will face serious living and development problems, posing a severe challenge to the education of rural areas in China.

Taking all this into consideration, Li proposed to address the problem by carrying out a new social management pattern upheld by the following four pillars: governmental supervision and guidance, social work services, community self-help and societal support.

Firstly, the care of left-behind children should be regarded as an important evaluating factor in the performance of local governments in the development of 'New Countryside Construction' and 'Innovation in Social Management'. A special focus organization should be set up by the government to manage the well-being of local left-behind children. Specific teams should be assigned to keep in communication with the left-behind children project office. If possible, the service quality for left-behind children should be taken into consideration when evaluating cadres' work performance.

Secondly, a system of rural social workers should be established as quickly as possible. Working stations for social workers should be set up in rural areas to provide professional social services, in part as a functioning replacement of family. Funds should be raised by the state government for the training of rural social workers.

Thirdly, rural local communities should pitch in with their resources and communal strength to maintain a self-help system and continue educating and taking care of left-behind children with help from the government.

Fourthly, social organizations should be encouraged to get involved in the care and development of rural left-behind children. These organizations should also be allowed to come up with a variety of problem-solving models.

(Source: womenofchina.cn/ Translated and edited by womenofchina.cn)

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