Divorce Up and Rising

  • December 7, 2011
  • Editor: Sun Xi
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[cq.qq.com]

[cq.qq.com]

Ministry of Civil Affairs statistics show that 1.46 million couples, or 5,300 per day, registered for divorce in the first three quarters of 2011— an 11.9 per cent year-on-year increase.

Southwest China's Sichuan Province leads the nation in this respect, having clocked up 117,538 divorces in the first three quarters of 2011.

Divorce has steadily risen in China for eight consecutive years. A recent survey finds that couples that have been married for nine to ten years, generally aged between 30 and 40, are most likely to divorce.
Marriage consultant Xiao Huiming of the Beijing Huiming Growth Consultancy Center regards the first three years after marrying as a running-in period and the seventh year as critical. Ten years after marriage is when fatigue is likely to set in.

"Husbands and wives try to be tolerant of one another in the first three years of marriage and remain cautious in the sixth and seventh years, commonly regarded as a dangerous period. After ten years, when kinship replaces love, however, they begin to squabble over trifles that were never a problem before," Xiao said.

As people aged between 30 and 40 have attained a certain level of accomplishment in their careers and developed a wide social contacts, their relatively better-off economic conditions easily attract admirers. Consequently this period is a critical test of conjugal relations.

Eight Consecutive Years of Relentless Divorce

While 30,000 or more couples happily headed for the department of civil affairs to register their marriages each day in the first three quarters of this year, 5,300 couples went there to register divorces. This figure does not take into account divorce cases heard in court.

Ministry of Civil Affairs data show that divorce over the past 11 years rose steadily from 1.331 million in 2003 to 2.678 million in 2010.

Seven-year Itch

Analyses of 200 divorce cases dealt with by the Beijing Dongcheng District People's Court shows that, among them, the longest marriage had lasted for 56 years and the shortest six months. Also that 35 per cent ended in divorce in less than seven years and 50 per cent in less than 15 years.

Of the 200 divorces examined, 66 marriages where one partner was born in the 1970s proved the most unstable, accounting for 33 per cent. 

Infidelity constituted the grounds for divorce in 60 per cent of the 200 suits filed by wives and domestic violence for 30 per cent.

Reasons for divorce also varied according to age and changes in women's social role. Women born in the 1960s lack the resources to be economically independent, and are reliant to some extent on their husband's incomes. Many gave up careers to devote themselves to their families, forfeiting in the process many of their social contacts.

Children are the greatest inhibitors of divorce. Mothers are generally willing to sacrifice their happiness in a loveless marriage for the sake of providing their offspring with the best environment for healthy growth in a complete family.

Women born in the 1970s, on the other hand, are relatively economically independent, and capable of supporting themselves after divorce. They are consequently not willing to put up with what they regard as their husbands' unacceptable behavior, whether adultery of domestic violence, or to live in an incompatible marriage relationship.

Overall Well-Off Society in China joined with the Tsinghua Media Survey Lab in publishing the  2011 Report on Love and Marriage Happiness Index, which pinpoints extramarital affairs, spouses' bad habits and domestic violence as the three main reasons why married couples divorce.

Statistics imply that men are more likely to have extramarital affairs, possibly because sex is foremost in their minds. As regards reasons for divorce, however, domestic violence is the predominant reason for women instituting divorce proceedings. Jiang Yongping, director of the department of policies and regulations, Women's Studies Institute of China (WSIC), All-China Women's Federation, holds that most Chinese people have high spiritual as well as material expectations of their marriages.

"People today place more emphasis on the rapport between spouses while they are together rather than on being loyal until death," Jiang said.

(Source: epaper.jinhua.cn/Translated and edited by womenofchina.cn)

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  • Divorce Up and Rising2011-12-07   Editor: Sun Xi

    [cq.qq.com]

    [cq.qq.com]

    Ministry of Civil Affairs statistics show that 1.46 million couples, or 5,300 per day, registered for divorce in the first three quarters of 2011— an 11.9 per cent year-on-year increase.

    Southwest China's Sichuan Province leads the nation in this respect, having clocked up 117,538 divorces in the first three quarters of 2011.

    Divorce has steadily risen in China for eight consecutive years. A recent survey finds that couples that have been married for nine to ten years, generally aged between 30 and 40, are most likely to divorce.
    Marriage consultant Xiao Huiming of the Beijing Huiming Growth Consultancy Center regards the first three years after marrying as a running-in period and the seventh year as critical. Ten years after marriage is when fatigue is likely to set in.

    "Husbands and wives try to be tolerant of one another in the first three years of marriage and remain cautious in the sixth and seventh years, commonly regarded as a dangerous period. After ten years, when kinship replaces love, however, they begin to squabble over trifles that were never a problem before," Xiao said.

    As people aged between 30 and 40 have attained a certain level of accomplishment in their careers and developed a wide social contacts, their relatively better-off economic conditions easily attract admirers. Consequently this period is a critical test of conjugal relations.

    Eight Consecutive Years of Relentless Divorce

    While 30,000 or more couples happily headed for the department of civil affairs to register their marriages each day in the first three quarters of this year, 5,300 couples went there to register divorces. This figure does not take into account divorce cases heard in court.

    Ministry of Civil Affairs data show that divorce over the past 11 years rose steadily from 1.331 million in 2003 to 2.678 million in 2010.

    Seven-year Itch

    Analyses of 200 divorce cases dealt with by the Beijing Dongcheng District People's Court shows that, among them, the longest marriage had lasted for 56 years and the shortest six months. Also that 35 per cent ended in divorce in less than seven years and 50 per cent in less than 15 years.

    Of the 200 divorces examined, 66 marriages where one partner was born in the 1970s proved the most unstable, accounting for 33 per cent. 

    Infidelity constituted the grounds for divorce in 60 per cent of the 200 suits filed by wives and domestic violence for 30 per cent.

    Reasons for divorce also varied according to age and changes in women's social role. Women born in the 1960s lack the resources to be economically independent, and are reliant to some extent on their husband's incomes. Many gave up careers to devote themselves to their families, forfeiting in the process many of their social contacts.

    Children are the greatest inhibitors of divorce. Mothers are generally willing to sacrifice their happiness in a loveless marriage for the sake of providing their offspring with the best environment for healthy growth in a complete family.

    Women born in the 1970s, on the other hand, are relatively economically independent, and capable of supporting themselves after divorce. They are consequently not willing to put up with what they regard as their husbands' unacceptable behavior, whether adultery of domestic violence, or to live in an incompatible marriage relationship.

    Overall Well-Off Society in China joined with the Tsinghua Media Survey Lab in publishing the  2011 Report on Love and Marriage Happiness Index, which pinpoints extramarital affairs, spouses' bad habits and domestic violence as the three main reasons why married couples divorce.

    Statistics imply that men are more likely to have extramarital affairs, possibly because sex is foremost in their minds. As regards reasons for divorce, however, domestic violence is the predominant reason for women instituting divorce proceedings. Jiang Yongping, director of the department of policies and regulations, Women's Studies Institute of China (WSIC), All-China Women's Federation, holds that most Chinese people have high spiritual as well as material expectations of their marriages.

    "People today place more emphasis on the rapport between spouses while they are together rather than on being loyal until death," Jiang said.

    (Source: epaper.jinhua.cn/Translated and edited by womenofchina.cn)