• Xiang XiuliDecember 12, 2011Xiang Xiuli (1933-1958) was the daughter of a poor shopkeeper in Guangzhou (Canton), Guangdong Province. When she was only seven years old, the landlord put her to work as a slave girl in his household. She was sent to work in a pharmaceutical factory when she was 13. After 'Liberation', after the founding of the People's Republic, she continued to work in the factory, and was recommended many times as an advanced worker.
  • Entertaining WomenDecember 12, 2011On many occasions, both younger and elder women were shown on posters while praising the accomplishments of socialism. Within the framework of what was considered appropriate during the high tide of Maoism, in terms of demeanor and dress, these images did succeed in conveying a certain amount of joy, although they were a far cry from the frivolous ladies of the advertising posters of earlier times.
  • Entrepreneurial WomenDecember 9, 2011Entrepreneurs, of course, always have been considered politically problematic in China. The traditional Confucian class division of society saw the entrepreneurs, or merchants, as less desirable than intellectuals, peasants, workers or even soldiers.
  • Tractor GirlsDecember 9, 2011From the early 1950s on, the female tractor driver was one of the most frequently seen symbols of Chinese socialist modernity. Known as the nüjie diyi (女界第一) model workers, the 'female-kind-first', they were part of the group of 'the first' women to be trained in work involving heavy machinery.
  • Working Women in ChinaDecember 9, 2011As a result of the double agenda pertaining to the emancipation of women, their participation in production, made visible in posters, was seen as one of the basic keys to bring about their liberation. Although posters of women working as welders or in other industrial activities do appear in the first one and a half decade of PRC-posters, most of their activities in this period remain located in agriculture.
  • Chinese Women Managers: Participation, Barriers and Future ProspectsDecember 9, 2011Women's role in management is an important issue. This is based not just on moral, but also on economic ground. Accompanying with the open-economy policies of China, female participation rates in labor markets have increased, but a similar expansion into managerial posts has lagged behind this, often an indication of the "Glass-Ceiling". This contribution examines the current labor market situation by gender and industry and provides theoretical explanations, indicating the social, cultural, rather than economic reasons only. We go to outline some possible ways to confront female managerial participation barriers and how to improve the situation in the future.
  • Women ParachutersDecember 9, 2011After the PRC was founded, one of the themes that formed a major inspiration for poster designers puzzling about how to portray the newly empowered women of China was that of the woman parachuter. By this trope, it was possible not only to visualize how women had thrown off the shackles of oppression, but also to devote attention to the People's Liberation Army that had played such a major part in their liberation by supporting the revolutionary struggle.
  • 1949-2007: Women Workers in ChinaDecember 9, 2011Wildcat analyse the situation, role and struggles of women in China from the Cultural Revolution until today.
  • Women's Struggle between Career and FamilyDecember 9, 2011As China's society and economy have become more open and service industry more developed, women with a good education or talent have come to enjoy more and better career opportunities than before.
  • The History of Chinese Career WomenNovember 1, 2011The escape of Chinese women from the household into working life constitutes a watershed in China's modern social history.Married and single women in China have been going out to work and carving out careers for themselves for the past three or more decades.
  • Work