I Used to Have You in My Life

May 14, 2014
Editor: Amanda Wu
I Used to Have You in My Life
Famous Hong Kong-based romance novelist Amy Cheung Siu Han's book I Used to Have You in My Life [Xinhua]

Famous Hong Kong-based romance novelist Amy Cheung Siu Han's book I Used to Have You in My Life tells the stories of three women who love their men unconditionally and impulsively seek the warmth of the world.

Previously titled Three Women with A Cup, the novel is one of Cheung's favorite works, originally published by Hong Kong-based Crown Publishing Group in 1995.

Cheung reveals through the book that a person cannot expect their life to be perfect and they may even need to be prepared to end up with nothing, with a refrain of wistful regret running through the narrative “…but I used to have you in my life, with your joy, smile and tears.”

The three women keep their men company when destiny brings them together, but turn away when destiny rends them asunder.

In 2013, Cheung ranked sixth on the 2013 Chinese Writers Rich List, an indicator of the publishing and reading trends in China, with her bestseller Thank You for Leaving Me (2013) generating 14 million yuan (U.S. $2.24 million) in royalties.

Born in Hong Kong in July 1967, Cheung attended Hong Kong Baptist College in the 1980s, during which she worked part time as a scenarist and in an administrative role at a TV station.

Cheung began writing in the early 1990s and rose to fame with her debut romance novel, The Woman in the Breadfruit Tree (1995), which was initially serialized in the Chinese-language newspaper Ming Pao in 1994.

To date, Cheung has published more than 40 novels and essay collections, enjoying a wide readership base.

(Source: Xinhua/Translated and edited by Women of China)

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