Xiang Jingyu: CPC's First Director of Women's Department

April 11, 2014
Editor: Frank Zhao
Xiang Jingyu: CPC's First Director of Women's Department

Xiang Jingyu was a well-known leader of the women's movement during the early period of the Communist Party of China (CPC). [Women Images]

Please click here for more photos of Xiang Jingyu.

Xiang Jingyu (1895-1928), previously named Xiang Junxian, was born in Xupu, central China's Hunan Province. A member of Tujia ethnic group, she was a well-known leader of the women's movement during the early period of the Communist Party of China (CPC), and was also a pioneer of China's women's movement.

In 1918, Xiang attended the New Citizen's Academic Association founded by Mao Zedong (1893-1976). In 1919, she went to France to attend work-study programs. In June 1920, she married Cai Hesen (1895-1931) in Montargis.

In 1922, Xiang joined the CPC and worked as the director of the Women’s Department, secretary of the Women’s Movement Committee, and chairperson of the Women’s Work Committee among other positions under the CPC Central Committee. She was also the chief editor of Women Weekly.

Xiang organized women workers in Shanghai Silk Factory, Gauze Factory, and Cigarette Factory to hold women's movement meetings and strikes.

In 1925, Xiang went to study at the Communist University of the Toilers of the East in Moscow, Russia. When she returned to China in 1927, she worked for the general labor union of Wuhan, Publicity Department of the CPC Hankou Municipal Committee, and CPC Hubei Provincial Committee. In March 1928, betrayed by traitors, she was arrested. The same year Xiang was killed at the young age of 33. She was honored by Mao Zedong as “Model Women Leader”.

 (Source: Baidu Images/Translated and edited by Women of China)

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