Women's Wisdom Shines in 2014 World Internet Conference

December 2, 2014
Editor: Tracy Zhu
Women's Wisdom Shines in 2014 World Internet Conference
The 2014 World Internet Conference was held from November 19–21 in Wuzhen, a historic "water town" situated in east China's Zhejiang Province, with the theme of "Connecting and Communicating Together: Sharing and Caring Together." Above is the beautiful scenery of Wuzhen in the morning.[xinhuanet.com]

The 2014 World Internet Conference was held from November 19–21 in Wuzhen, a historic "water town" situated in east China's Zhejiang Province, with the theme of "Connecting and Communicating Together: Sharing and Caring Together." The big event brought together more than 1,000 representatives from tech companies and institutions. The conference covered  a number of Internet-based topics, including global Internet governance, mobile Internet, cross-border e-commerce, cyber security and terrorism.

At this big event, many women shined, catching people's eye with their wisdom and insight. Of these exemplary women, the following four were the most notable, sharing their views on the future development of the Internet:

 

Josephine Cheng, Vice President of the IBM China Development Laboratories

Josephine Cheng, vice president of the IBM China Development Laboratories [cnwomen.com.cn]

Josephine Cheng, vice president of the IBM China Development Laboratories, shared her ideas on the development of Internet technology and on the future outlook of IBM and China's Internet enterprises.

Cheng said that new technologies — highlighted by cloud computing, vast amounts of data, social media and mobile technologies — are revolutionizing the entire market. The unprecedented amounts of available of data have brought with them significant development opportunities for all enterprises. Furthermore, the new digital age is ushering in a new commercial dynamic: Competitors are finding that the "win or lose" relationship that previously loomed over competing brands is making way for a new relationship, whereby competitors can feed off of each other to both achieve success — a "win-win" situation.

Cheng also noted that the future of technology will be one of "cognitive systems." In the not-too-distant time to which she alludes, a completely new and unprecedented generation of computing systems will come into being.

As the vice president of IBM, Cheng has played a large role in recent years with IBM's "Made for China" business strategy: to develop and innovate specifically for the Chinese market. "Now, we are taking a new strategic route: 'Made with China,' whereby we will innovate with other Chinese enterprises together, showcasing IBM's proficiencies in openness, collaboration and innovation," said Cheng.

An IBM veteran with more than 30 years' experience, Cheng has built quite the track record of achievement and innovation in relational database development.
When she started at IBM in 1976, Josephine Cheng was one of the first women in her department; and her impact was immediate, proving her high ability right from the very beginning. Before long, she was known as a visionary technologist and leader who was unafraid to take on "impossible tasks" — which, not coincidentally, suddenly became possible under her guidance. She has been awarded 25 patents for her inventions. In 2000, Cheng was named an IBM Fellow, the highest technical honor within the company.
In 2006, Cheng was inducted into the United States National Academy of Engineering for her achievements and leadership.

Born in Vietnam and raised in Hong Kong, Josephine Cheng is generous with her knowledge and experience, having devoted a great deal of time mentoring countless colleagues of hers at IBM. Concerned about the relatively small number of female technical leaders in China, she hopes to strengthen the pipeline of female technical talent. "Enjoy your work," said Cheng when asked what advice she would offer to IBM's new hires. "Have passion for what you are doing. A positive attitude is also very important: It solves the problems you face and helps you move forward."

 

Zhang Xiulan, Professor and Former Director of the School of Social Development and Public Policy at Beijing Normal University

Zhang Xiulan, professor and former director of the School of Social Development and Public Policy at Beijing Normal University [cnwomen.com.cn]

Zhang Xiulan, professor and former director of the School of Social Development and Public Policy at Beijing Normal University, spoke at the sub-forum "Internet and Government: Public-Service Innovation."

Zhang's speech focused on a key problem with the new Internet age: how to better share social [Tracy, this doesn't solve the issue: I still don't know exactly what you mean by "social resources" with respect to the Internet. Could you perhaps elaborate on what "social resources" or "online resources" refer to? Without more information, this paragraph is a little bit too vague.]resources, especially to allow the most grass-rooted people to benefit from public online resources themselves too.

Zhang noted that in China, in which there is a significant rural–urban gap with respect to development, this is an important issue the government as well as society as a whole needs to consider.

Zhang said that she had found a lot of inspiration in modern Internet technology. She holds the idea that the services or commodities needed by small and limited groups of customers could be connected together by the Internet and could be formed into a fairly large market. For example, when people in medium- or small-sized cities and even people living in rural areas want to buy brand-name products, they now are able to use the Internet to make the purchase and then have the products brought to their doorstep by an express-delivery network.

"The Internet could integrate the resources of a country — or even of the entire world — to create a better, more optimal distribution of resources," said Zhang.

 

Pan Fu'ai, Director of the Global System for the Mobile Communications Assembly (GSMA)

Pan Fu'ai, director of the Global System for the Mobile Communications Assembly (GSMA) [cnwomen.com.cn]

Pan Fu'ai, director of the Global System for the Mobile Communications Assembly (GSMA) said, "Mobile Internet technology is the priority, at the core of all the reasons why the Internet has been developing so quickly."

A study has shown that 2.2 billion people in the world have been using mobile-Internet devices to surf the web. By 2020, half of the entire world population will be getting their Internet access through mobile Internet. Similarly, in the following six years, another 1.6 billion people will begin using mobile-Internet technology to access the Internet.

Nevertheless, "With mobile Internet, we still have a lot of things to accomplish," Pan said. When asked to use three words to describe the Internet market in China, she said without thinking, "Vigorous, exciting and innovative."

 

Ge Huijun, Director of the Publicity Department of CPC Zhejiang Provincial Committee

Ge Huijun, director of the Publicity Department of the Zhejiang Provincial Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) and deputy director of the Organizing Committee of the 2014 World Internet Conference [cnwomen.com.cn]

Ge Huijun, director of the Publicity Department of the Zhejiang Provincial Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) and deputy director of the Organizing Committee of the 2014 World Internet Conference, delivered a speech at its closing ceremony on November 21.

In her speech, Ge said, "Along with the big wave of the Internet, the Zhejiang people have shown not only an outstanding pioneering spirit and inclusiveness with respect to China's reforms and economy but have also shown astonishing innovation and imagination. The emergence of key Internet business leaders — such as Ma Yun — and Internet companies with internationally famous brands like Alibaba have made Zhejiang Province a leader within the Chinese landscape of Internet technology and e-business."

Ge added that the choosing of Wuzhen as the conference's host is sure to bring new opportunities for the development and strengthening of the digital industries in Zhejiang.

(Source: cnwomen.com.cn/ Translated and edited by Women of China)

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