2017 Reading Report: Youth in Competitive Cities Read More

April 28, 2017
By XinhuaEditor: Penny Huang
2017 Reading Report: Youth in Competitive Cities Read More
To celebrate Book Day (April 23) and enable the public to enjoy the joy of reading, iReader jointly promoted a public-welfare reading campaign at the event with renowned writers from China and abroad such as Yang Lan, Zheng Yuanjie, Rao Xueman, Ma Boyong, Yuval Noah Harari; and, some 600 prestigious publishing companies. [Xinhua]

 

To mark World Book Day (April 23), iReader, China's leading e-book brand, recently published a reading report on Chinese youth, indicating that young people in competitive cities read more social science books for self-improvement.

Reading Purposes Are Changing

In general, young people preferred to read more books for self-development, compared with 2016.

Regarding gender differences, the findings showed that young men preferred books on skills of speech, memory enhancement and confidence construction whereas women tended to choose books related to the philosophy of life, social psychology and EQ cultivation for self-improvement and inner peace.

When asked about reading purposes, 40 percent of the respondents read for learning and growth and 41 percent focus on literature and arts. Only 19 percent read for leisure and entertainment.

A majority of young readers surveyed felt self-improvement during reading. Over 85 percent said reading could "upgrade their quality" and 96 percent chose "broadening horizons after reading books". Nearly 90 percent believed they became more friendly, with 92 percent "more optimistic and strong-minded".

Youth in More Competitive Cities Read More Books on Social Science

Regarding books related to social science such as Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, four-fifths of the readers are males and people aged between 28-37 accounted for the highest proportion among all age groups.

The report implied that young people in more developed and competitive cities more tended to improve themselves by reading and showed more preference of such categories than those in second- and third-tier cities. More precisely, the amount of people reading in Shanghai and Beijing is four times that of readers in Chengdu and five times more than those in Wuhan.

Reading Conditions Among Various Age Groups

According to the report, about 68 percent of people reading on the iReader online platform are under 25 years old and they tended to read books on vehicles, at bedtime and while going out.

In terms of the type of books people prefer to read, the report indicated distinctive features for readers among various age groups.

The average high school student read 19 books every year and the quantity for college students was 18. People who have been working for three years read 16 books a year.

High school students prefer to read suspense fiction, fantastic fiction and literature and graduates are more concerned about books on success and employment. Readers who have been working for three years focus on interpersonal relationships and general history.

Regarding the reading cost, findings indicated a steadily rising trend with age. More precisely, students studying in high schools spend on average 52 yuan (U.S.$ 7.5) per year whereas the average spending for college students is 72 yuan (U.S.$ 10.5). For people who have graduated for three years, they spend 102 yuan (U.S.$ 14.8) a year.

To celebrate Book Day and enable the public to enjoy the joy of reading, iReader jointly promoted a public-welfare reading campaign at the event with renowned writers from China and abroad such as Yang Lan, Zheng Yuanjie, Rao Xueman, Ma Boyong, Yuval Noah Harari; and, some 600 prestigious publishing companies including Citic Press, Xiron Press and Guomai Press.

(Source: Xinhua/Translated and edited by Women of China)

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