Chinese Babies Get Haircuts for Longtaitou Festival

March 1, 2017
By Liu ChenpingEditor: Rong Chen
Chinese Babies Get Haircuts for Longtaitou Festival

A baby gets a hair cut in a barber's shop. [West China Metropolis Daily/Liu Chenping]

 

Chinese parents get their babies' heads shaved on the second day of the nation's second lunar month in order to mark a specific holiday – Longtaitou Festival – which falls on February 27 this year.

According to oriental legends, the deity in charge of rain is a mystical dragon who raises its head and starts to bring rain to the spring season starting from this particular date.

To celebrate this festival, people will cut their hair, which they've long saved during the Spring Festival period.

Some photographers also mark the annual tradition by visiting barber shops across the country. For example, the photos below are shot in such a store owned by Chen Jianzong, a senior hairdresser who lives in the city of Chengdu, southwest China's Sichuan Province.

 

Chinese Babies Get Haircuts for Longtaitou Festival

A hairdresser shaves a baby's head. [West China Metropolis Daily/Liu Chenping]

Chinese Babies Get Haircuts for Longtaitou Festival

[West China Metropolis Daily/Liu Chenping]

Chinese Babies Get Haircuts for Longtaitou Festival

[West China Metropolis Daily/Liu Chenping]

Chinese Babies Get Haircuts for Longtaitou Festival

A parent helps hold a baby's head in order to get his hair shaved. [West China Metropolis Daily/Liu Chenping]

Chinese Babies Get Haircuts for Longtaitou Festival

Chen Jianzong shaves a boy's hair while he is crying. [West China Metropolis Daily/Liu Chenping]

 

(Source: West China Metropolis Daily/Translated and edited by Women of China)

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