CWU Wraps up 2015 Seminar on Social Management Capacity Building for Female Officials from Developing Countries

November 1, 2015
Editor: Candy Liao

On October 28, China Women's University (CWU) held a closing ceremony for the recent Seminar on Social Management Capacity Building for Female Officials from Developing Countries in 2015. 

Xu Kai, director of the International Liaison Department of the International Business Official's Training Institute; project team leader Feng Xiao; Song Wenyan, vice-minister of the International Liaison Department of the All-China Women's Federation; and CWU vice-president Liu Meng attended the ceremony.
 
Some 52 female officials and foreign aid workers from 20 countries also participated in the event, including those from Zimbabwe, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Armenia, South Africa, Pakistan, Lebanon, Zambia, Cuba, Mexico, Panama, and Belarus. Ye Shuiping, director of the university's Foreign Affairs Office, presided over the gathering.

 Xu praised the significance of the seminar, fully affirmed CWU's efforts of thoughtful arrangement, standardized management and hard work. Trainees listened to, saw, and experienced the real China and its development through lectures and field visits, he said. As a developing country, China is facing the same problems and challenges as other developing nations. China is willing to share experiences and establish friendly relations with other developing countries, and hopes to work with them to build a peaceful and harmonious world, Xu said.

Xu congratulated the trainees on their outstanding completion of the courses. He expressed hope that other developing countries could fully trust and work together with China to create a better future. The seminar is not only a platform for communication, but also a bridge that connects people from different countries, he said. Xu also hoped that trainees could take the knowledges gained back to their own countries, and share informations on the real China with their colleagues, friends, and families for a better understanding. 

He also hoped that the trainees could act as a bridge to promote both cooperation and friendship through mutual efforts.

On behalf of the CWU, Liu hoped that all the trainees could improve their management abilities, learn more about China, and join in efforts to promote social development and gender equality. CWU is committed to servicing women's development and social economic development, and strives to develop female officials. CWU will continue to create opportunities for cooperation, and make efforts to fulfill global gender equality, Liu added.

Nozi Mabafokeng Nkoe, an officer from South Africa, delivered a speech on behalf of all the trainees. She thanked the Chinese government for holding the seminar, and CWU's contribution. After two weeks of training, she had felt the power of Chinese women, and recognized the government's emphasis on women's careers, poverty alleviation and environmental protection. She promised to cherish the opportunity, to take China's experiences back home, and jointly contribute to gender equality in developing countries.

Xu and Liu awarded certificates and commemorative gifts to the trainees respectively. 

The event was hosted by the Ministry of Commerce, and sponsored by CWU. Since 2013, CWU has held six sessions of foreign aid workshops. A total of 175 female officials from 46 countries and regions have participated in these events.
 
The training courses enhanced the exchanges and friendship between the participating countries and China, set up a platform for further cooperation, and laid a solid foundation for promoting international exchange and cooperation.

(Source: China Women's University/Translated and edited by Women of China)

Please understand that womenofchina.cn,a non-profit, information-communication website, cannot reach every writer before using articles and images. For copyright issues, please contact us by emailing: website@womenofchina.cn. The articles published and opinions expressed on this website represent the opinions of writers and are not necessarily shared by womenofchina.cn.


32.3K
Comments