United Nations Population Fund Releases Gender-based Violence Survey

December 17, 2013
Editor: Nancy Sun

United Nations Population Fund Releases Gender-based Violence Survey
Survey shows that half of interviewed Chinese men have used physical or/and sexual violence against a female partner during their lifetime. [legaldaily.com.cn]
According a survey published by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) on December 16, 2013, half of interviewed Chinese men have used physical or/and sexual violence against a female partner during their lifetime.

The study looked at gender-based violence in the Asia Pacific region, and was carried out jointly by UNFPA China and the Partners for Prevention program, the UN joint program on gender-based violence in Asia Pacific, the Institute of Sexuality and Gender Studies of Beijing Forestry University and Anti-domestic Violence Network/Beijing Fan Bao. It interviewed 1,017 men and 1,103 women aged 18-49 in a county in central China.

Among the female respondents who were ever-partnered, 39 percent reported experiencing physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence (IPV). About 52 percent of men reported physical and/or sexual IPV perpetration. Thirty eight percent of ever-partnered women reported experiencing emotional violence and 43 percent of men reported having committed emotional violence against a female partner.

The study showed that unequal power relations between men and women are still deeply embedded in gender norms, which are the root causes of gender-based violence. The research showed that key elements of socially accepted masculinity of "real men" are toughness, sexual prowess, control of decision making and use of force in some occasions. Of all the men interviewed, 73 percent believe that men should be tough, 52 percent would use violence to defend their honor and 72 percent think that men have decision power over major issues within the family.

"The studies confirm that gender-based violence is preventable… and the majority of factors associated with men's use of violence can be changed," said Mr. Arie Hoekman, UNFPA Representative to China.

"We need to transform the ways in which boys and men socialize and relate to girls and women. That is why adolescence is a unique opportunity to foster respectful relationships and endorse cultural norms supportive of gender equality."

The study recommended that the government, communities and individuals take steps to increase empowerment for women and girls and eliminate gender discrimination, promote non-violent, caring ways to be a man, and support women who have been the victims of rape and violence.

(Source: china.org.cn)

Please understand that womenofchina.cn,a non-profit, information-communication website, cannot reach every writer before using articles and images. For copyright issues, please contact us by emailing: website@womenofchina.cn. The articles published and opinions expressed on this website represent the opinions of writers and are not necessarily shared by womenofchina.cn.


32.3K
Comments