Chinese-American Appointed First Female Chief Medical Officer for U.S. Olympic Team

July 5, 2012
Editor: Liu Yunting

According to World Journal, physician Cindy J. Chang, a 48-year-old Chinese-American, will serve as the chief medical officer for the United States Olympic team, managing a total of 80 doctors, massage therapists, chiropractors and trainers to keep 525 athletes healthy during the London Olympic Games that will open on July 27, 2012. Chang is the first woman to hold the position. 

Dr. Cindy J. Chang at the UC Berkeley Student Health Center in Berkeley, California, on June 20, 2012. Chang will travel to London in July to be the U.S. Olympic team's chief medical officer. [mercurynews.com]

Dr. Cindy J. Chang at the UC Berkeley Student Health Center in Berkeley, California, on June 20, 2012. Chang will travel to London in July to be the U.S. Olympic team's chief medical officer. [mercurynews.com]

A graduate from Ohio State University, Chang became the head sports physician for the University of California, Berkeley in 1995. Later, she also served as the chief medical officer for the 2008 U.S. Paralympic team in Beijing, working with elite disabled athletes, and as a doctor with the winter Paralympic teams in 1998 and 2002. Her wide experience in treating athletes at international events has since led U.S. Olympic Committee officials to hand her the London job.

Aside from her treatment and management duties, Chang will also be the medical team's spokesperson, explaining any serious injuries and illnesses.

"It's best if you never see me on TV," said Chang. "Because that means all the athletes are fine." 

Dr. Cindy J. Chang at the UC Berkeley Student Health Center in Berkeley, California, on June 20, 2012. Chang will travel to London in July to be the U.S. Olympic team's chief medical officer. [mercurynews.com]

Dr. Cindy J. Chang at the UC Berkeley Student Health Center in Berkeley, California, on June 20, 2012. Chang will travel to London in July to be the U.S. Olympic team's chief medical officer. [mercurynews.com]

Despite the high honor of working as the chief medical officer for the U.S. Olympic team, it is an unpaid duty. Chang said she volunteered for the position and that it means a lot to her.

"Earlier in my professional career, women doctors faced many challenges. Some veteran coaches did not want to cooperate with us and even if they worked with us, they would not take our advice seriously," noted Chang. "I will cherish this opportunity and do my best to fulfill my responsibilities."

Chang began sending doctors to Europe to keep abreast of medical developments there and to inspect British hospitals and Olympic venues months ago. In order to provide timely and proper treatment to American athletes, she believes such preparations are only to be expected.

(Source: Chinanews.com / Translated by womenofchina.cn)

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